BLINDS CORNERS AND CURVES

Blinds corners and curves - Flowering trees for shade.

CAMERA SHUTTER RELEASE CABLE. RELEASE CABLE


Camera Shutter Release Cable. Aluminum Sunshade



Camera Shutter Release Cable





camera shutter release cable






    shutter release
  • The button you press to take the picture. Often half pressing the Shutter Release activates the autofocus, auto exposure and vibration reduction, and a full press is required to actually take the picture.

  • The mechanism, usually a button on the top of the camera, that activates the shutter to expose the film.

  • The button on a camera that is pressed to make the shutter open





    camera
  • A chamber or round building

  • television camera: television equipment consisting of a lens system that focuses an image on a photosensitive mosaic that is scanned by an electron beam

  • A camera is a device that records/stores images. These images may be still photographs or moving images such as videos or movies. The term camera comes from the camera obscura (Latin for "dark chamber"), an early mechanism for projecting images. The modern camera evolved from the camera obscura.

  • equipment for taking photographs (usually consisting of a lightproof box with a lens at one end and light-sensitive film at the other)





    cable
  • a telegram sent abroad

  • send cables, wires, or telegrams

  • a conductor for transmitting electrical or optical signals or electric power

  • Transmit (a message) by cablegram

  • Send a cablegram

  • Contact or send a message to (someone) by cablegram











Sonicare




Sonicare





Big thanks to everyone who got this on explore!!!!

Image of water being dropped onto a vibrating sonicare toothbrush, shot at 1/8000 of a second. I needed the extremely high shutter speed due to the crazy fast vibrations of this thing. I tried this shot with milk (looked kinda odd) as well as dish soap (didn't splatter), but I think I like this one the best. I taped the toothbrush to a cheap tripod and when turned on the whole tripod vibrated like heck. Hope my downstairs neighbors don't hate me =]

Setup: The only way to get the high shutter speed was to use a flash in high speed mode, so I used an OC-E3 off camera cord as it was the only thing that would work for this setup. Flash was about 45 degrees to the left, and I used some white paper on the right to bounce the fill. Red poster board was placed behind the toothbrush.

Gear: 580exII, Canon 50D, 100mm macro lens, Tripod for camera, second tripod with toothbrush taped to it, shutter release cable, toothbrush, water, posterboard, paper



Comments and criticisms always appreciated

















Homemade Digital Shutter release




Homemade Digital Shutter release





I spent way too much time messing with this thing today but it works like a
champ!. With about $30, I was able to build the homemade shutter release
with a 40' extension. I built it modular so that I had a short version to
use right off of the camera or to add the 37' extension to it to get some
distance. I have a bird feeder on my deck that I get a lot of visitors
(when I remember to put food out) I wanted to be able to tripod mount my
EOS and run the long cable through the living room window so that I could
fire some really close shots of the bird friends. See the next shot that
was taken using this setup (no birds before it got dark)









camera shutter release cable







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CANOPY MANUFACTURERS - MANUFACTURERS


Canopy Manufacturers - Canopy Brackets - Draw The Drapes.



Canopy Manufacturers





canopy manufacturers






    manufacturers
  • (manufacture) industry: the organized action of making of goods and services for sale; "American industry is making increased use of computers to control production"

  • A person or company that makes goods for sale

  • (manufacture) create or produce in a mechanical way; "This novelist has been manufacturing his books following his initial success"

  • (manufacture) put together out of artificial or natural components or parts; "the company fabricates plastic chairs"; "They manufacture small toys"; He manufactured a popular cereal"





    canopy
  • the transparent covering of an aircraft cockpit

  • cover with a canopy

  • the umbrellalike part of a parachute that fills with air

  • Cover or provide with a canopy











canopy manufacturers - Wanda -




Wanda - UP320XA20 - Portofino Sundura Offset Patio Umbrella - Black - 10 ft. Square


Wanda - UP320XA20 - Portofino Sundura Offset Patio Umbrella - Black - 10 ft. Square



Introducing the Wanda 32020 Portofino Sundura Offset Patio Umbrella - Black - 10 ft. Square, featured in our Umbrellas department. This product generally ships within 5 business day(s) from Los Angeles, California, and weighs 86 pound(s). The Wanda 10' Square Portofino Style Tilting Offset Patio Umbrella offers you the advantage of placing your patio furniture where you want instead of having to work around a clumsy center pole. Combined with the 360 degree rotating and tilting umbrella canopy, you can easily find precious shade all day. Priced affordably with a full one-year warranty, Wanda Portofino Style Offset Tilting umbrellas are a best buy. Relax and stay 'made in the shade' all year long.










82% (14)





The Stables Tolson Museum Ravensknowle Hall Huddersfield Yorkshire




The Stables Tolson Museum Ravensknowle Hall Huddersfield Yorkshire





For almost 140 years, a group of parcels of land in Dalton have made up a small estate part of which is now Ravensknowle Park. Set in the middle of this estate stands Tolson Museum, formerly called Ravensknowle Hall, a mansion built about 1860 by John Beaumont, a woollen manufacturer.

Among the middle class, family ties were important in both business and social life and from 1827 to 1919, the estate (apart from one brief period), remained within the same family, passing from uncle to nephew, from father to daughter and from cousin to cousin. However, the casualties and the social upheaval caused by the First World War disrupted middle class life and in 1919, Legh Tolson made a gift of the hall and part of the grounds to what was then Huddersfield Corporation, as a memorial to his nephews Robert Huntriss Tolson and James Martin Tolson, who were both killed during the fighting.

'The Tolson Memorial' was to become a museum organised according to the scheme worked out by Dr T W Woodhead of Huddersfield Technical College, and under his guidance, it became one of the country's leading local museums, systematically organised according to a progression of subjects. It was also an institution with educational responsibilities, and much use was made of models, full size casts and removable display units which could be used with visiting parties.

The subsequent years have seen many alterations to the permanent displays and the museum now houses permanent galleries on subjects ranging from Transport, Textiles, Archaeology and the Huddersfield area.

Information from the museum website.

























Canopy frames painted interior green, then exterior color




Canopy frames painted interior green, then exterior color





Note that the aft most lengthwise frames don't actually separate different pieces of canopy- they're internal, not external. Unlike US manufacturers, who painted topside camo on interior bits that were up against the canopy, de Havilland were content to paint the framework Interior Gray Green protective finish and leave it that way.

DSC_0618









canopy manufacturers








canopy manufacturers




Find a Chinese Manufacturer






Note: This is an ebook but you DO NOT need a Kindle to read it. If you look to the far right of this page, you should see a clickable icon for Kindle for PC. You can download that for free and read Amazon ebooks on your PC or laptop.

Top 7 Pitfalls of Doing Business in China

Managing international supply chains requires good strategy derived from; a basic knowledge of international business, a sixth sense that will sound the alarm when things aren’t quite right, and follow up that would make a micromanager with OCD look negligent.

It seems so simple: Here’s the order and the money, go make the stuff and ship it to the United States.

How could things go wrong?

Well things do go south. A lot.

Here are the seven most common pitfalls in the China-US supply chain.

1. Due diligence was not done and the supplier is not a quality operation. This goes back to the genesis of the search for a manufacturer in China. A bad pick was made because there was no knowledge to make a better choice.

2. Product specifications were not specific enough or were not put fully in writing. The manufacturer either made a decision for you to keep the factory moving or used cheap inputs* because raw material quality was not specified.
*inputs are all the things that go into making your product, such as raw materials like cloth or plastics.

3. Failure to foster a strong relationship with the right people. If the only person you know is a low ranking Customer Service Rep, you have a problem. Guanxi, a person’s connections and relationships in China, is a currency all its own. Zero guanxi translates into zero leverage.

4. Too much trust and not enough follow-up. Just because everyone agrees on what should be done does not mean it is going to happen. Don’t believe what you’re told, find out if it’s true. Did production really start on the 10th? Trust but verify.

5. The supplier is hiding problems. Maybe they are struggling with a labor shortage or there were raw material delays or other issues that are being quietly swept under the rug. You won’t know until a key deadline has passed or defective goods have been received.

6. Failing to understand international transportation logistics and import requirements. What are the Incoterms? Do you have a forwarder? An import bond? What is the harmonization code of your product and what is the tariff rate? Should you ship by ocean or air? Does your supplier have an export license? Can’t answer these question? Don’t know what some of these words mean? Then stay out of China until you do.

7. Giving up too much power. Prepaying orders in full or not using third party inspection removes the ability to motivate results.

In less than 20 pages, you will be well on your way to avoiding all the potential pitfalls listed above. You will know who you need to contact, what a scam looks like, and how to verify a manufacturer's capabilities.

Welcome to the syllabus for your learning curve.

Note: This is an ebook but you DO NOT need a Kindle to read it. If you look to the far right of this page, you should see a clickable icon for Kindle for PC. You can download that for free and read Amazon ebooks on your PC or laptop.

Top 7 Pitfalls of Doing Business in China

Managing international supply chains requires good strategy derived from; a basic knowledge of international business, a sixth sense that will sound the alarm when things aren’t quite right, and follow up that would make a micromanager with OCD look negligent.

It seems so simple: Here’s the order and the money, go make the stuff and ship it to the United States.

How could things go wrong?

Well things do go south. A lot.

Here are the seven most common pitfalls in the China-US supply chain.

1. Due diligence was not done and the supplier is not a quality operation. This goes back to the genesis of the search for a manufacturer in China. A bad pick was made because there was no knowledge to make a better choice.

2. Product specifications were not specific enough or were not put fully in writing. The manufacturer either made a decision for you to keep the factory moving or used cheap inputs* because raw material quality was not specified.
*inputs are all the things that go into making your product, such as raw materials like cloth or plastics.

3. Failure to foster a strong relationship with the right people. If the only person you know is a low ranking Customer Service Rep, you have a problem. Guanxi, a person’s connections and relationships in China, is a currency all its own. Zero guanxi translates into zero leverage.

4. Too much trust and not enough follow-up. Just because everyone agrees on what should be done does not mean it is going to happen. Don’t believe what you’re told, find out if it’s true. Did production really start on the 10th? Trust but verify.

5. The supplier is hiding problems. Maybe they are struggling with a labor shortage or there were raw material delays or other issues that are being quietly swept under the rug. You won’t know until a key deadline has passed or defective goods have been received.

6. Failing to understand international transportation logistics and import requirements. What are the Incoterms? Do you have a forwarder? An import bond? What is the harmonization code of your product and what is the tariff rate? Should you ship by ocean or air? Does your supplier have an export license? Can’t answer these question? Don’t know what some of these words mean? Then stay out of China until you do.

7. Giving up too much power. Prepaying orders in full or not using third party inspection removes the ability to motivate results.

In less than 20 pages, you will be well on your way to avoiding all the potential pitfalls listed above. You will know who you need to contact, what a scam looks like, and how to verify a manufacturer's capabilities.

Welcome to the syllabus for your learning curve.










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DRAPERY HARDWARE CORNER. HARDWARE CORNER


Drapery hardware corner. Arch window draperies. Roll blinds.



Drapery Hardware Corner





drapery hardware corner






    drapery hardware
  • Any fixture that supports drapery or shades that are hung on windows like rods, rings, hooks, brackets, etc.





    corner
  • A place where two streets meet

  • A place or angle where two or more sides or edges meet

  • a place off to the side of an area; "he tripled to the rightfield corner"; "the southeastern corner of the Mediterranean"

  • gain control over; "corner the gold market"

  • the point where two lines meet or intersect; "the corners of a rectangle"

  • An area inside a room, box, or square-shaped space, near the place where two or more edges or surfaces meet











Ensenberger Building- Bloomington IL




Ensenberger Building- Bloomington IL





Gustave Adolph Ensenberger came to the United States from Bavaria in Germany in 1854. Only three years old at the time, he and his family initially settled in Ohio and then moved to Indiana. Gustave went to school until the age of twelve when he began to work in order to help support his family. George Ensenberger, Gustave's father, went off to fight with the Union Army in the Civil War in the early 1860s. Upon his return, George brought his family to Bloomington, Illinois, in April 1868. He was encouraged to do so by an old friend, Dr. Herman Schroeder, a horticulturist. Dr. Schroeder encouraged many of his friends to make a home in Bloomington because of its rich farmland, prosperity, and great opportunity.
After establishing a new residence, Gustave went to work in Dr. Schroeder's vineyard. He then followed in the footsteps of his father and the many other woodworkers from his family's past. He was hired by the Bloomington Manufacturing Company where he assisted in the making of cabinets and other furniture. After this experience, Gustave decided he wanted to start his own furniture manufacturing business. In 1879, he opened the Bee Hive store on the corner of Front and Center Streets. The making of the furniture was done inside the building, and then it was put out on the sidewalk to be sold. Not long after opening its doors, the business moved a couple doors east on Front Street into the Gridley Building. In the next few years, Gustave's efforts fueled the growth of his company. In 1886, he purchased the D.B. Harwood Hardware Store Building at 212 N. Center Street. This address was the location of the business for the next 109 years. While business was booming, Gustave decided that he needed to continue expanding. In 1909 and 1910, a six-story building was constructed to connect with the original building on the Madison Street side. It was designed by George Miller. In the same years, a warehouse for the Ensenberger business was created on the corner of Washington Street and Roosevelt Avenue.
Over the years, the business began to sell other manufacturers' merchandise in addition to its own. Expansion was also evident by the fact that the store added a rug department along with draperies, linoleums, window shades, phonographs, lamps, and pianos. As a result of all these events, the business prospered, and Gustave became an admired Bloomington citizen. He was also considered an upstanding citizen because of his involvement in the community's civic affairs. Meanwhile, while Gustave was attempting to run a successful business, his wife, Elizabeth Reisch Ensenberger, gave birth to five children, Frank, Gus, Joseph, Eleanor Marie, and Marie Frances. Both daughters died at a very young age. However, Frank, Gus, and Joseph survived and grew up with the business, which proved to be a major influence in their lives. After Gustave retired in 1913, his sons took control of the business. Frank became president; Joe became vice-president; and Gus became secretary-treasurer. Also, in 1914, the firm was incorporated as G.A. Ensenberger & Sons. The three sons managed the firm successfully even after their father's death in 1917.
As the years progressed, the sons decided that they wanted to construct a new building that would replace the present one. In 1925 and 1926, a modern English Gothic building was created to house the furniture store. Designed by the A.L. Pillsbury firm, this structure was unlike any other building in Bloomington. With its gothic spires, colorful terra-cotta medallions, and ornate indoor decorations, the new seven-story Ensenberger building was an architectural wonder that cost between $250,000 and $300,000 to create. The opening of the store occurred on May 11, 1926. It was estimated that 40,000 people, some from as far away as California and New York, visited the store during the first five days after the opening. Frank, Gus, and Joe continued to operate the store for the next few decades.
In 1972 when Joe died, his son, Joseph, became president of the business. Five years later, Joseph moved to New Mexico and left control of the company in the hands of his brother, Jack Ensenberger. Jack continued to operate the firm with the help of his son, David, and his daughter, Lucy, the fourth generation of Ensenbergers to take part in this furniture enterprise. In the 1990s, the Ensenberger store was being hurt by the changing behavior of consumers. Customers were more likely to shop at a variety of stores. They paid more attention to prices. Lastly, there was a declining loyalty to longtime retailers among customers. Therefore, since the business had trouble competing in the furniture market, Jack closed its doors in November 1995.

from mchistory.org











Lyttelton 1855




Lyttelton 1855





This is a restoration of the earliest known photograph of Lyttelton. Dated 1855, it is view down Canterbury Street from the north-east corner of the intersection at London Street. Taken from the immediate vicinity of what is now the site of the Volcano Cafe, it shows what was then the main shopping street of the early port. The conflaguration of 1870 cleared the way for the horizontal London Street to replace Canterbury Street in that respect.

Viewed from the south-west corner of London Street are:

Armitage Brothers's Butchery

William Pratt's Drapery and General store. Pratt subsequently sold out to the Baker and Confectioner Thomas Gee (this photograph comes from the collection of Gee's Grandson, Alfred Selwyn Bruce). William Pratt went on to found the Christchurch store that became Ballantynes.

The front fence of the house of Henry William Reid. A Dr. McCheyne lost his life by falling down the (extant) entrance steps behind the gate.

Unknown shop.

Samuel Gundry's hardware store

Mrs Coe's Drapery shop

The Livery Stables of Thomas Bruce and Coe (the aforementioned Alfred Selwyn Bruce (1866-1936) was the son of Thomas Bruce (1826-1899) and his wife Ellen, formerly Gee (1833-1928).

The first Mitre hotel on the corner of Norwich Quay, opened by Major Hornbrook in 1849 and destroyed by fire in 1870.











drapery hardware corner







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